Htc desire 820 360 degree view

HTC Desire degree view and 3D view,° virtual tour of the HTC Desire View degree view of HTC Desire virtual tour lets you view your favourite phone from each and every angle. Do More of What You Love with the HTC Desire STORE LOCATOR; HTC Desire 10 pro dual sim HTC Desire CHANGE YOUR VIEW.


HTC Desire 826 dot view cover(In detail)





Materials on the Desire once again instill mixed feelings. We found ourselves constantly smudging and touching it while handling the device. The Xiaomi, however is not big on looks. FM radio no RDS. Sony Xperia Z Ultra headphones attached. The Gallery app uses a Lollipop style navigation drawer to separate viewing modes.
HTC Desire degree view and 3D view,° virtual tour of the HTC Desire View degree view of HTC Desire virtual tour lets you view your favourite phone from each and every angle. Do More of What You Love with the HTC Desire STORE LOCATOR; HTC Desire 10 pro dual sim HTC Desire CHANGE YOUR VIEW.



5.allsoftgoods.com: HTC Desire dual sim 3D view - ° spin.


Shop for htc desire at Best Buy. Degree Cameras; HTC - Dot View Case for HTC Desire and s Cell Phones.


Do More of What You Love with the HTC Desire STORE LOCATOR; HTC Desire 10 pro dual sim HTC Desire CHANGE YOUR VIEW.


HTC Desire degree spin. The HTC Desire uses the traditional threaded view for SMS and HTC Desire & Desire dual SIM review: The doppelganger;.


HTC Desire degree spin. The HTC Desire uses the traditional threaded view for SMS and HTC Desire & Desire dual SIM review: The doppelganger;.


Shop for htc desire at Best Buy. Degree Cameras; HTC - Dot View Case for HTC Desire and s Cell Phones.


Degree view of HTC Desire look around phone in all angles.


Shop for htc desire at Best Buy. Degree Cameras; HTC - Dot View Case for HTC Desire and s Cell Phones.



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As already mentioned the panel is identical to that found in its predecessor - the Desire and is consequently plagued by much the same problems. The rather physically large lens is framed by a circular plastic rim it and definitely draws the attention to itself. The Watch list feature works on sites like YouTube and Vimeo. The two devices seem similar enough for the scores to match up, but seeing as this is not the case, we can perhaps point a finger towards the new octa-core Snapdragon processors or, if not that, software issues that need some tweaking. Looking at the specs sheet, we can't help but notice that although the Desire borrows the display from the , the lack of screen protection has been addressed and the handset is equipped with Gorilla Glass 3.



The ease with which it gets smudged is almost ridiculous, so you can expect a full set of prints ready for forensic analysis to constantly adorn the back plate. In addition to being a grease-magnet, the plastic in question is also surprisingly easy to scuff and scratch.

Our review unit got scratched without ever leaving the office and with zero exposure to pockets or cases. For some reason HTC has also dealt away with the metal buttons on the Desire and replaced them with plastic ones.

The color accents surrounding them fit nicely with the camera and front. One may argue that it is all in the name of a unified design signature, but we can't help bet miss the metal details, which, while scarce, seem to add a bit of a premium feel to a device.

At the end of the day the Desire does fit nicely into HTC's current design vision and despite the imperfect choice of materials it feels sturdy enough to last. Some of the aforementioned design elements really bring down the overall impression and take away a lot of the premium feel, but then again the Desire is intended as a mid-ranged device.

Taking a look around the HTC Desire we can't miss its prominent large front-facing speakers. The BoomSound offers superb audio quality, not unlike the One M8 and are strategically placed as far apart as possible to ensure maximum stereo effect.

The front bears an uncanny resemblance to the HTC Desire , which is only natural, given that the display is identical. The front-facing camera is in the exact same position and you have to really look at it closely to notice the larger lens size.

The BSI sensor has been bumped up to 8MP and now offers even better quality shots and p video recording. Right below the camera is a cleverly concealed status LED that lights up when charging and blinks for notification. You can chose which events trigger the light - missed calls, messages, email, calendar events and alarms.

The bezel is not excessive but does strike as a little too wide at the top and bottom of the screen. It almost feels like HTC intended to fit a larger display on the handset, but decided to go with 5. The logo on the bottom black strip does fill up some of the space but we can't help but feel that the whole area would be perfect for two dedicated buttons.

Sadly, HTC has decided to go down the simpler road with only software Back and Menu buttons available. The main 13MP camera is a very prominent design feature on the Desire As already mentioned, it is rather oddly placed at the very edge of the top left corner of the device.

The rather physically large lens is framed by a circular plastic rim it and definitely draws the attention to itself. Holding the device with two hands in portrait mode can consequently be a hustle as one hand needs to be slightly offset for the camera to be exposed.

It is simply a little annoying that you have to be constantly aware of where your hands are when shooting. We can't help but feel that this was absolutely avoidable by the design team. The main shooter also protrudes quite a lot which means that it is inevitably going to get scuffed or scratched.

And if the rest of the plastic is any indication for material quality, we can only imagine that it won't be long until photos start to come out blurry and fuzzy. Speaking of the back panel it is part of the unibody design and is thus non-removable, just like the one on the Desire It houses the 2, mAh Li-Po battery, which really seems rather unprepared to handle the power requirements, but more on that later.

SIM and SD slots are positioned on the side of the Desire , nicely tugged away behind a plastic flap in their own little compartment. We weren't too eager to play around with it as it seems kind of flimsy and could potentially suffer if caught on a pocket edge or other piece of clothing.

On the other hand, this setup does offer ease of access to the cards and is a welcome sight with all the recent cradle and caddy designs, which are often a struggle. The buttons feel cheap and plastic. The top of the phablet features a 3.

The bottom is home to just the microUSB 2. The HTC Desire is equipped with a 5. It is nothing spectacular by today's standards, but is nonetheless, a solid choice for a mid-range smartphone.

As already mentioned the panel is identical to that found in its predecessor - the Desire and is consequently plagued by much the same problems. While the panel does use IPS technology and hence offers excellent side viewing angles, the edges on the screen elements looks a little jagged under close observation.

Bet perhaps the biggest concern is the poor brightness. The phone doesn't come off as exceptionally bright, but this is more or less compensated by the good contrast, which definitely improves outside visibility.

Looking at the specs sheet, we can't help but notice that although the Desire borrows the display from the , the lack of screen protection has been addressed and the handset is equipped with Gorilla Glass 3. What good is a quality screen that is all scratched-up.

HTC definitely deserves credit for improved attention in this department. The added protective layer seems to be have led to a slight increase in reflectivity as the blacks on the Desire apper a bit brighter than on the Desire On the other hand maximum brigtness seems to show a slight improvement, boosting the whites and consequently, the contrast.

It is also absolutely identical to the one found in the Desire , but surprisingly enough, while the Desire scored quite favorably at 64h, this is not exactly true for the phone at hand. Our tests showed an oddly low 49h endurance rating and may we remind that this is a mixed result from fairly favorable conditions.

Still the numbers speak loud and clear and the Desire will not be winning any endurance races any time soon. The question remains as to why this anomaly exists. The two devices seem similar enough for the scores to match up, but seeing as this is not the case, we can perhaps point a finger towards the new octa-core Snapdragon processors or, if not that, software issues that need some tweaking.

The possibility of a faulty test unit is also there, but it seems very unlikely. You can check out our battery testing procedure in detail. There are also two separate power-saving modes implemented in Sense UI 6 that could potentially help better the battery life.

Power Saving dims the screen and slows the CPU down, while the Extreme Power Saving mode does away with multitasking and background tasks altogether and switches the UI to a very simple version, meant for only the most basic of tasks.

The Extreme Power Saving mode turns the Desire into a feature phone. While this is extremely useful to have and could potentially get you out of a tight situation, the two modes are for emergency use only and therefore had no place in out measurements.

The device uses only nanoSIM cards, despite the ample room, but it is far from the only offender in this department. The built-in Dual network manager also allows the manual selection of the mode of each slot, so you can change which slot will be 3G-enabled from the UI without having to physically rearrange the cards.

HTC's website does not disclose anything in regard to NFC functionality, but we are happy to report that our unit does have this functionality onboard. It might be a regional option, as was with the Desire , so be sure to check before you buy a unit.

Speaking of that, the Bluetooth-enabled HTC BoomBass cube can pair wirelessly with the stereo speakers on the phablet for even better sonic experience. HTC Sense 6 is feature-rich and offers a smooth and fluent user experience.

The lockscreen features a clock with weather info plus four shortcut slots. Missed calls and incoming messages are duly displayed, too, of course. Widgets are optional and disabled by default. Swiping up the unlock button gives you three different options.

Swiping up takes you to the last app you used, while swiping to the left or to the right will take you to the homescreen or BlinkFeed respectively. HTC Sense 6 lockscreen with optional widgets.

This generation of HTC products features on-screen buttons with the classic arrangement of Back, Home and App switcher. HTC's custom scheme of only Back and Home key has been dropped and we don't miss it.

It aggregates content from your social networks, as well as from over a thousand news sources. You can pick the topics you're interested in and BlinkFeed will automatically pull relevant content. You can also search for specific content.

BlinkFeed combines social updates with news articles. Homescreens are fully customizable with links and widgets. If you don't find BlikFeed particularly useful and don't want it lingering on the front you can do away with it just like any other widget.

The notification area features quick toggles similar to those of vanilla Android. They can be accessed via the dedicated button or with a two-finger swipe. The toggles can't be reordered or hidden, but a long press brings out the relevant Settings page, just like in Samsung's TouchWiz.

Some like the Brightness toggle are multi stage so you tap them several times until you reach the desired mode and often have a more precise slider option in the settings area. Power toggles made it to the notification area.

Note that the status bar on top of the screen is normally semi-transparent or black, but select HTC apps change its color to match their own highlight color, similar to iOS. This doesn't seem to work with third-party apps though.

The default layout of the app drawer is a 4 x 5 grid of app icons. A 3 x 4 mode is also available but that's a waste of a 5. You can sort app icons alphabetically, chronologically or manually and you can hide the ones you don't need but can't uninstall bloatware.

HTC has remodeled the task switching interface - recent apps are displayed in a 3 x 3 grid of thumbnails. This allows more apps to fit on the screen but since there's no scrolling, a total of 9 is all the recent apps you'll see.

This does not limit multitasking, but you can easily lose track of older open applications. Custom app switcher complete with a shortcut for the Running apps screen. HTC Sense has a dedicated Car mode screen, which can be preset to launch automatically when the phablet connects to your car's Bluetooth.

Car mode with big, easy to hit buttons. HTC Desire also has a built-in restricted access Kid mode. It is an app that lets you set up a profile for each of your kids - with a photo and birthdate - and pick which apps they can have access to.

This is a notable improvement over its predecessor, the Desire , but interestingly enough, the fairly comparable eight A53 cores do not fair all that well against the four Cortex A7 ones, found inside the A7.

This might just be due to the higher clock rate on the Snapdragon , but all in all, in a lot of respects the Desire does not seem to offer as big of a performance increase as we would have liked to see. Results with the Basemark OS II were really inconsistent on the Desire for some reason and we found ourselves having to retest several times.

The total score is expectedly a bit ahead of the Desire , but single and multi-core tests just seem a little off. Perhaps it's a software bug or some optimization issue, but in any case the numbers should be taken with a grain of salt.

Keep in mind that the chart might also be a little misleading as the Desire is absent and for a good reason. It was tested under Antutu 4, which had a different scoring chart, but the difference between the two is pretty much identical to the one observed in GeekBench.

The Adreno GPU is nothing spectacular and the Desire fails to amaze in most rendering tests but definitely holds its own. Real-life performance is of course, a whole other question and as evident from the onscreen scores, the mid-ranged device handles rendering nicely.

The lower screen resolution has certainly attributed towards the respectable scores. The Adreno offscreen graphics test at p resolution is rather disappointing, but expected for the particular chip.

The onscreen performance is much better and the device delivers very respectable frame rates almost topping the charts. As already mentioned, the lower screen resolution does aid a lot but one thing is for sure, the Desire delivers playable frame-rates on graphics-intensive tasks, something that the Desire is badly struggling with.

JavaScript performance is not great, though it's in line with what we can expect from a mid-range device. In the BrowserMark 2. These tests fully stress the browser we used the stock browser, by the way , in daily browsing the phablet works without annoying slowdowns.

Interestingly enough, looking back at the Desire yet again, we can't help but notice a very slight improvement in overall browser performance. Taking into account the fact that the pair uses the same HTC Sense software, we have to deduct that the Desire is mostly under-optimized rather than underpowered and this, while fixable is all up to the manufacturer to address at this point.

The HTC Desire is a middle of the road device when it comes to performance. It's not sluggish by any means and it will do okay for daily multitasking, browsing and even 3D games. From a user point of view, we didn't experience any major hiccups and the UI does look and feel very polished and functional, but more on that later.

The People app groups the dialer, call log, contacts, favorites and groups in tabs, which can be reordered or removed. A dropdown allows you to filter contacts by source - stored in the phone, coming from an online phonebook or a social network.

Individual contact info is displayed in tabs too, a Sense tradition. The first tab shows basic contact info like phone numbers, emails, work info plus individual options for ringtones, blocking the contact and adding them to Private contacts.

Private contacts is a discrete option that hides the name and photo of a contact when there's an incoming call. Viewing a contact's basic info. The second tab, Thread lists all communication history between you and the given contact - texts, emails and calls.

The third and final tab displays the contact's social networking updates for easy access. Tabs here can be reordered and hidden, too. The dialer on the HTC Desire displays the last call with a contact photo so you can easily redial someone.

There's smart dialing that looks for both names and contacts. You can even switch to a regular QWERTY keyboard though you have to do this each time you open the dialer and we still find that the dial pad is quicker, it was invented for a reason after all.

There's a Large dial pad mode, which predictably makes the buttons bigger but also displays the full call log behind the pad instead of just the last call as with the Standard dial pad. When you try to scroll the list, the dial pad gets out of the way.

For these reasons we preferred this mode over the Standard. It is just a more user-friendly experience. The Large dial pad has bigger keys and a full list of recent calls. The HTC Desire can ring louder when it detects it's in a pocket, quiet down when you pick it up and shut up altogether when you flip it over.

The Do not disturb mode can mute all notifications including timers and alarms if you like on a given schedule with multiple rules, e. Only contacts on the exceptions list can get through in case of emergency.

Contacts can be added to the blocked list to filter out unwanted calls even outside of Do not disturb mode. If you dial an unknown contact, the dialer can ask you if you want to save it to the phonebook this is disabled by default.

The phablet borrows the BoomSound speakers from the premium One family - two speakers on the front. They put out nice sound though in tuning for audio quality HTC lost some of the loudness. Voice and music levels are virtually equal with the Desire Some threads can be moved to a "secure box", which requires a password to be opened.

There's built-in functionality to block messages from certain numbers, those go in the Block box where you can view them later if you like or set the app to discard them immediately.

The look of the app can be tweaked with color schemes and custom backgrounds, font size and how many lines are used for preview in threaded view. The Messages app can also backup and restore messages, so you don't need a third-party app for that.

The HTC Desire comes with two email apps - a skinned version of the stock email app and the dedicated Gmail app. The native one has a combined inbox and supports options for peak and off-peak syncing.

For both you can have the app check for new mail after a preset periods or use Smart Sync to learn your habits and automatically figure out the best interval. The Mail app has a combined Inbox. The keyboard offers big, comfortable keys and you can run a calibration tool if you think the default setup slips up.

A Swype-like Trace option is available and you can enable bilingual prediction vital with so many English terms entering every day speech in most languages. Other customization options include switching between layouts e.

HTC Zoe is a mini social network centered around sharing photos and videos. A landmark feature is the cool Highlights videos, which are created automatically for each album. Zoe requires you to sign in with your HTC account the first time you open it.

This is to enable sharing with other contacts, who can add their own photos, videos and music to the Highlight videos that are created automatically from your shots. You can send requests to your friends too, to give them a little nudge to add shots to your Highlights.

You can manually create a Highlight video too - you simply choose from the available images, select a theme and soundtrack and you're done. The Gallery app uses a Lollipop style navigation drawer to separate viewing modes.

Timeline and location group photos accordingly, while Albums work like folders. You can manually create albums, the app will ask you to select a number of photos and videos to either copy or move.

Mass selection of photos seems to be lacking which is rather annoying and photos have to be moved one by one. A nice little addition to the gallery is the custom search function. Interestingly enough it not only does through photo meta data, but can also do a sort of reverse image search and find similar photos to a preselected one.

Manually created albums get a Highlight video as their title image. You can select which items go into the video, in what order and with what effects and music. There are options to go back to the default chronological order, music and theme so don't be afraid to experiment.

The start and end clips can be selected manually if you want to create a sort of title card and credits. Customizing an album's Highlight video. There's a special Media gesture useful here and in the music and video players - swipe up with three fingers to "throw" the content you're viewing to a DLNA device.

Throwing a media file to a DLNA device with a three-finger gesture. Sound is an issue too with no multichannel audio support, we even had an issue with MP3 audio in a p AVI file. AC3 seems to be all but unavailable.

The video player interface. As for the interface, you get basic playback controls and the option to snap a screenshot. Subtitles are not supported. The HTC Sense 6 music player uses a tabbed layout and as with other apps you can hide tabs and reorder them.

The tabs sort your music library by different categories and include the relatively rare Folder view, in case you have a sort of "mixtape" folder. Browsing the music library. The first time you launch the music player it will ask whether it should automatically download Album art, artist photos and lyrics and you can limit it to Wi-Fi only downloads.

There's a cool visualizer on board with multiple different looks, but HTC once again forgot to put in an equalizer. All you get is a BoomSound option, which can be either on or off and only works with headphones plugged in.

Still audiophiles should be glad to hear FLAC is supported both bit and bit but you'll really need a microSD card for that as the built-in memory isn't much. Bluetooth with aptX is another high-quality option to wirelessly stream audio.

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It was tested under Antutu 4, which had a different scoring chart, but the difference between the two is pretty much identical to the one observed in GeekBench. The Adreno GPU is nothing spectacular and the Desire fails to amaze in most rendering tests but definitely holds its own.

Real-life performance is of course, a whole other question and as evident from the onscreen scores, the mid-ranged device handles rendering nicely. The lower screen resolution has certainly attributed towards the respectable scores.

The Adreno offscreen graphics test at p resolution is rather disappointing, but expected for the particular chip. The onscreen performance is much better and the device delivers very respectable frame rates almost topping the charts.

As already mentioned, the lower screen resolution does aid a lot but one thing is for sure, the Desire delivers playable frame-rates on graphics-intensive tasks, something that the Desire is badly struggling with.

JavaScript performance is not great, though it's in line with what we can expect from a mid-range device. In the BrowserMark 2. These tests fully stress the browser we used the stock browser, by the way , in daily browsing the phablet works without annoying slowdowns.

Interestingly enough, looking back at the Desire yet again, we can't help but notice a very slight improvement in overall browser performance. Taking into account the fact that the pair uses the same HTC Sense software, we have to deduct that the Desire is mostly under-optimized rather than underpowered and this, while fixable is all up to the manufacturer to address at this point.

The HTC Desire is a middle of the road device when it comes to performance. It's not sluggish by any means and it will do okay for daily multitasking, browsing and even 3D games. From a user point of view, we didn't experience any major hiccups and the UI does look and feel very polished and functional, but more on that later.

The People app groups the dialer, call log, contacts, favorites and groups in tabs, which can be reordered or removed. A dropdown allows you to filter contacts by source - stored in the phone, coming from an online phonebook or a social network.

Individual contact info is displayed in tabs too, a Sense tradition. The first tab shows basic contact info like phone numbers, emails, work info plus individual options for ringtones, blocking the contact and adding them to Private contacts.

Private contacts is a discrete option that hides the name and photo of a contact when there's an incoming call. Viewing a contact's basic info. The second tab, Thread lists all communication history between you and the given contact - texts, emails and calls.

The third and final tab displays the contact's social networking updates for easy access. Tabs here can be reordered and hidden, too. The dialer on the HTC Desire displays the last call with a contact photo so you can easily redial someone.

There's smart dialing that looks for both names and contacts. You can even switch to a regular QWERTY keyboard though you have to do this each time you open the dialer and we still find that the dial pad is quicker, it was invented for a reason after all.

There's a Large dial pad mode, which predictably makes the buttons bigger but also displays the full call log behind the pad instead of just the last call as with the Standard dial pad. When you try to scroll the list, the dial pad gets out of the way.

For these reasons we preferred this mode over the Standard. It is just a more user-friendly experience. The Large dial pad has bigger keys and a full list of recent calls. The HTC Desire can ring louder when it detects it's in a pocket, quiet down when you pick it up and shut up altogether when you flip it over.

The Do not disturb mode can mute all notifications including timers and alarms if you like on a given schedule with multiple rules, e. Only contacts on the exceptions list can get through in case of emergency. Contacts can be added to the blocked list to filter out unwanted calls even outside of Do not disturb mode.

If you dial an unknown contact, the dialer can ask you if you want to save it to the phonebook this is disabled by default. The phablet borrows the BoomSound speakers from the premium One family - two speakers on the front.

They put out nice sound though in tuning for audio quality HTC lost some of the loudness. Voice and music levels are virtually equal with the Desire Some threads can be moved to a "secure box", which requires a password to be opened.

There's built-in functionality to block messages from certain numbers, those go in the Block box where you can view them later if you like or set the app to discard them immediately. The look of the app can be tweaked with color schemes and custom backgrounds, font size and how many lines are used for preview in threaded view.

The Messages app can also backup and restore messages, so you don't need a third-party app for that. The HTC Desire comes with two email apps - a skinned version of the stock email app and the dedicated Gmail app. The native one has a combined inbox and supports options for peak and off-peak syncing.

For both you can have the app check for new mail after a preset periods or use Smart Sync to learn your habits and automatically figure out the best interval. The Mail app has a combined Inbox.

The keyboard offers big, comfortable keys and you can run a calibration tool if you think the default setup slips up. A Swype-like Trace option is available and you can enable bilingual prediction vital with so many English terms entering every day speech in most languages.

Other customization options include switching between layouts e. HTC Zoe is a mini social network centered around sharing photos and videos. A landmark feature is the cool Highlights videos, which are created automatically for each album.

Zoe requires you to sign in with your HTC account the first time you open it. This is to enable sharing with other contacts, who can add their own photos, videos and music to the Highlight videos that are created automatically from your shots.

You can send requests to your friends too, to give them a little nudge to add shots to your Highlights. You can manually create a Highlight video too - you simply choose from the available images, select a theme and soundtrack and you're done.

The Gallery app uses a Lollipop style navigation drawer to separate viewing modes. Timeline and location group photos accordingly, while Albums work like folders. You can manually create albums, the app will ask you to select a number of photos and videos to either copy or move.

Mass selection of photos seems to be lacking which is rather annoying and photos have to be moved one by one. A nice little addition to the gallery is the custom search function. Interestingly enough it not only does through photo meta data, but can also do a sort of reverse image search and find similar photos to a preselected one.

Manually created albums get a Highlight video as their title image. You can select which items go into the video, in what order and with what effects and music. There are options to go back to the default chronological order, music and theme so don't be afraid to experiment.

The start and end clips can be selected manually if you want to create a sort of title card and credits. Customizing an album's Highlight video. There's a special Media gesture useful here and in the music and video players - swipe up with three fingers to "throw" the content you're viewing to a DLNA device.

Throwing a media file to a DLNA device with a three-finger gesture. Sound is an issue too with no multichannel audio support, we even had an issue with MP3 audio in a p AVI file. AC3 seems to be all but unavailable. The video player interface.

As for the interface, you get basic playback controls and the option to snap a screenshot. Subtitles are not supported. The HTC Sense 6 music player uses a tabbed layout and as with other apps you can hide tabs and reorder them.

The tabs sort your music library by different categories and include the relatively rare Folder view, in case you have a sort of "mixtape" folder. Browsing the music library. The first time you launch the music player it will ask whether it should automatically download Album art, artist photos and lyrics and you can limit it to Wi-Fi only downloads.

There's a cool visualizer on board with multiple different looks, but HTC once again forgot to put in an equalizer. All you get is a BoomSound option, which can be either on or off and only works with headphones plugged in.

Still audiophiles should be glad to hear FLAC is supported both bit and bit but you'll really need a microSD card for that as the built-in memory isn't much. Bluetooth with aptX is another high-quality option to wirelessly stream audio.

It can play through the speakers but still needs a pair of headphones to serve as an antenna. FM radio no RDS. When we start referring to an audio output as good as the one on the Desire as "slightly disappointing", this tells you all you need to know about the status HTC was able to achieve in terms of audio reproduction.

It's not that the phablet does bad, in fact it's quite good, but it's not as perfect as its stablemates we've reviewed lately. The HTC Desire showed high volume levels in the first part of our test - the one where it works with an active external amplifier.

Its output was very clean too as testified by the majority of its scores, which were excellent. The sole exception was stereo crosstalk, which was slightly above average for this scenario. Plug in a pair of headphones and you get a lot of extra crosstalk as well as some distortion, leading to a less than perfectly clean output.

Volume levels are still fairly high and the output is overall above average, but it's not a class-leading performance as we we've come to expect from HTC handsets. HTC Desire frequency response. The shooter seems to be absolutely identical to the one in the Desire , which is in no way a complaint, as it has already proven its worth.

This phone does not have a dedicated image processing chip as more expensive HTC models so naturally, some features are missing Zoe mode most notably. It does have HDR, Panorama with a digital horizon level , geo-tagging and image effects.

The settings are hidden by default, but you can control ISO, exposure compensation, white balance and image adjustments. A long press on the screen will lock exposure and focus. You can set the volume rocker to act as a zoom lever or a shutter key.

From the settings you can enable smile shutter and adjust the Make-up level, which tries to digitally pretty you up. This is perhaps one of HTC's primary selling points for the phone. Few contenders can offer such a nice front-facing shooter in this price range and seeing how the selfie fad is not going away any time soon the Desire is a perfect choice to fill up your social networks.

This is perhaps the reason HTC has put in additional effort into tweaking the software adding extra features like Split Capture and Photo booth modes. The camera on the HTC Desire is undoubtedly its strongest feature.

While in other departments the phone may be slightly lacking or even kind of mediocre, you can definitely count on amazing photos from the mid-ranged handset. HTC has obviously struck gold with the particular camera hardware and thankfully, it is here to stay for the time being.

As already mentioned the Desire seems to be equipped with the superb camera found in its predecessor, the Desire Photos are amazingly sharp. We are more than pleased with the way the camera picks exposure and colors, even in mixed light.

Digital noise is visible but it's not that obvious as it takes the form of only luminance noise. There are no color blotches. There's equal sharpness edge to edge and there are no noticeable lens issues. HTC Desire camera samples.

HTC Desire macro sample. HDR off and on. HTC Desire panorama sample. The HTC Desire has one really nice camera. The only downside is that it tends to pick a warmer white balance to most photos, which results in a yellowish tint, which is noticeable on our sample images, and especially the first chart.

HTC Desire in our photo compare tool. One again HTC is sticking to what works and video quality seems all but unchanged from the Desire There are a few small software changes, most notable that video recording is no longer a dedicated mode, but rather integrated in a second button in the primary shooting screen.

Video shooting is no longer a dedicated mode. This is convenient, but sadly it brings about the much familiar hustle with not having a clear idea of the actual video viewport prior to recording. This is a problem that many manufacturers seem to overlook, but is genuinely annoying when you thinks you are aiming at something, but are actually capturing something else.

The Desire shoots p videos at 30fps, though there's also a special Fast HD 60fps mode at p. The front-facing camera can also record p videos. Other options include slow-motion video, image effects and settings for ISO, exposure compensation and white balance.

The p videos from the main camera have a 20Mbps bitrate and the audio is recorded in stereo with a bitrate of kbps. Another thing to note is that the colors seems a bit oversaturated, but oftentimes it's how users prefer them.

Below you can see a regular pixel video sample as well as a Fast HD 60fps one. The midrange Desire fares quite well when compared to identically price phablets, as you can see in our Video comparison tool. Unfortunately, that's only true in good light, as in low light the level of resolved detail drops dramatically.

HTC Desire in our video compare tool. It packs the usual features of Incognito tabs Find in page and Desktop view. Note that GIF animation needs to be enabled from the settings. Besides the usual bookmarks, you can keep a Reading list of pages to read later and a Watch list of videos.

Pages are saved on-device so they can be read offline, but videos are not. The Watch list feature works on sites like YouTube and Vimeo. It detects multiple videos per page so you can add them all and when you're ready to watch it shows just the video with no distractions from the page it was on.

Google Chrome is becoming the most popular mobile browser and should be fairly familiar to any Android user. It has advantages over its vanilla buddy, including switching between tabs with a wide swipe from either the left or right of the top bar.

Chrome has Incognito tabs, too. Speaking of tabs, it can sync what you have open on other devices desktop, tablets with the phone. This feature also syncs your bookmarks and favorite sites and can remember passwords and login data.

The Reduce data usage option sends web pages to be compressed on Google's web servers before loading them on the device to save data and speed up slow connections. This doesn't work for SSL-protected pages and Incognito tabs for privacy reasons.

The app handles files stored locally along with ones in your Google Drive account. The View Together option lets you do a presentation on multiple devices by connecting them together wirelessly. Polaris Office 5 with Google Drive integration.

HTC has skinned the calendar to match Sense 6 looks. Adding an event lets you specify time with a warning if there's a conflict with another event , who will attend and where the meeting will be held. Multiple online calendars are supported.

HTC Sense 6 calendar. The Tasks app is another way to organize time. It can handle multiple separate lists of tasks and syncs with your Google account. Each task can have a due date and a location associated with it.

Map view lets you easily find nearby tasks, though we would have loved a "Navigate to" button here. HTC Backup can do manual or scheduled backups of your apps, messages texts and emails , contacts and accounts mail and social.

The data is sent either to Google Drive or Dropbox and you can limit the app to transfer over Wi-Fi only. The alarm clock application can handle multiple alarms, each with its own start and repeat time.

The stopwatch and timer are self-explanatory. Google Maps is the default navigation app and is the only one a typical user needs. It allows you to download offline maps of an area and even plan routes without a data connection.

It can plan driving, public transport, cycling and walking routes. With a data connection it will also display traffic alerts. Finally, Google Now integrates with your Google account and can access your daily routine, internet searches, email, etc.

It provides traffic information to your work or home, knows the scores of sports teams you follow and gives you the weather forecast for your location. It's great for at-a-glance info, but can handle voice input as well.

The HTC Guide app is an excellent app for beginners. It contains tips and help, troubleshooting info and a display of the vital phone stats the support call center might ask you about. The phone health option offers some self-help tools like running diagnostic on individual components speakers, backlight, buttons.

The app will also help you manage the storage with a handy option to clean unwanted files and trackers for call minutes, texts and data plan megabytes. Another great support tool is Android Device Manager.

It's available for all Android devices with a Google account can help you find your Desire by ringing it and if it's not at the house, by finding it on the map. If it's stolen, you also have the option to lock the device and delete all data so make sure you have HTC Backup set up so you don't lose your data.

In a lot of ways the HTC Desire is the natural continuation of the mid-range handset line and can be considered more or less an upgraded version of the Desire It is a solid device on its own, but HTC could have tried a little harder and addressed some of the issues in its predecessor better.

HTC has built-up a formidable reputation for offering some of the best-built devices on the market. The Desire definitely looks put together well enough, but the choice of materials is a letdown, perhaps even more than with the Desire , and that's plain disappointing.

If there is one thing this job has taught us is to keep our expectations in check when we approach a device for review. We won't expect much from an entry level smartphone, but an upper midrange device like the Desire deserves a higher quality finish than the fingerprint mess that the plastic back panel becomes in no time.

The hardware on the Desire definitely looks improved on paper, but sadly it does not outperform its predecessor by a whole lot, which is surprising, given the new octa-core CPU. Perhaps software optimization is lacking or the chips are intentionally under-powered so as not to diminish the problematic battery life even further.

In any case, the p display goes easy on the resources and real-life performance is more than satisfactory. With FREE Shipping, your order will be delivered within the estimated shipping speed available after you checkout.

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The button placement is a lot more convenient and the Desire seems to offer a more polished experience as a whole. The smartphone market seems to be shifting its focus more on mid-range devices that are stepping in as the new driving force, especially in emerging Asian markets.

HTC has definitely caught that tendency and is putting a lot of effort into its more budget-oriented devices. But can the HTC Desire live up to the popularity of its predecessor and satisfy cost-conscious consumer needs in an ever growing and increasingly dynamic smartphone market?

Follow us to the next pages for our two cents on the matter. Inside however there is nothing too over the top. Besides a few leaflets, the Desire is also bundled with a few essentials. A pretty standard 1A wall charger is included, as well as a sturdy USB cable and a pair of headphones.

The headset is nothing spectacular, but it is definitely a nice little touch that we were happy to see, having discovered that the HTC Desire Eye did not include one. This might be a regional bundling thing, we can't say for sure.

The HTC Desire comes in a surprisingly this body measuring only 7. This is an improvement over the Desire with a whole 0. On the other hand the camera on the Desire is rather uncomfortably big and very protruding.

While this does serve as a welcome highlight on the otherwise standard look of the device, the camera really gets in the way during regular use. We found ourselves constantly smudging and touching it while handling the device.

The lens is also placed so near to the edge of the device that you have to be extremely careful while shooting in landscape mode so you don't accidentally cover it. As already mentioned the Desire really follows current HTC design trends with its two-color unibody and nicely rounded corners.

It is reminiscent of the Desire , but the Taiwanese tech giant has really been taking notes and a lot of what annoyed us with that device is now rethought, but sadly the phone is far from perfect design and material-wise.

The lock button is something we have had a long grudge with. HTC seems to be taking steps to address the issue as it has been moved once again. The initial placement above the screen, like in the flagship One M8 was quite inconvenient especially in a tall device.

On the Desire it was oddly moved to the left side of the device, above the volume rockers, which is an improvement, but not ideal. Now it seems that the Desire finally got it right as the key is literally on the right-hand side.

Seeing how the device is even higher than its predecessor, measuring in at The left side now houses a neatly covered department with slots for a one or two SIM chips, depending on the model, plus a SD card.

HTC Desire in the hand. Speaking of dimensions, the phablet is fairly sizable for a 5. The bezels are relatively thin on the sides making for The front-facing speakers do, however make for a pretty tall device, but the extra height does not automatically translate to more weight and the unit weighs g and feels nicely balanced.

Materials on the Desire once again instill mixed feelings. On one hand, the top and bottom plastic plates encasing the BoomSound speakers are made of a nice matte plastic. But on the other, it is really a shame that the rest of the unibody is coated with less than premium glossy material, which happens to be in love with finger-prints.

Thin and slick sides. The ease with which it gets smudged is almost ridiculous, so you can expect a full set of prints ready for forensic analysis to constantly adorn the back plate. In addition to being a grease-magnet, the plastic in question is also surprisingly easy to scuff and scratch.

Our review unit got scratched without ever leaving the office and with zero exposure to pockets or cases. For some reason HTC has also dealt away with the metal buttons on the Desire and replaced them with plastic ones.

The color accents surrounding them fit nicely with the camera and front. One may argue that it is all in the name of a unified design signature, but we can't help bet miss the metal details, which, while scarce, seem to add a bit of a premium feel to a device.

At the end of the day the Desire does fit nicely into HTC's current design vision and despite the imperfect choice of materials it feels sturdy enough to last. Some of the aforementioned design elements really bring down the overall impression and take away a lot of the premium feel, but then again the Desire is intended as a mid-ranged device.

Taking a look around the HTC Desire we can't miss its prominent large front-facing speakers. The BoomSound offers superb audio quality, not unlike the One M8 and are strategically placed as far apart as possible to ensure maximum stereo effect.

The front bears an uncanny resemblance to the HTC Desire , which is only natural, given that the display is identical. The front-facing camera is in the exact same position and you have to really look at it closely to notice the larger lens size.

The BSI sensor has been bumped up to 8MP and now offers even better quality shots and p video recording. Right below the camera is a cleverly concealed status LED that lights up when charging and blinks for notification.

You can chose which events trigger the light - missed calls, messages, email, calendar events and alarms. The bezel is not excessive but does strike as a little too wide at the top and bottom of the screen.

It almost feels like HTC intended to fit a larger display on the handset, but decided to go with 5. The logo on the bottom black strip does fill up some of the space but we can't help but feel that the whole area would be perfect for two dedicated buttons.

Sadly, HTC has decided to go down the simpler road with only software Back and Menu buttons available. The main 13MP camera is a very prominent design feature on the Desire As already mentioned, it is rather oddly placed at the very edge of the top left corner of the device.

The rather physically large lens is framed by a circular plastic rim it and definitely draws the attention to itself. Holding the device with two hands in portrait mode can consequently be a hustle as one hand needs to be slightly offset for the camera to be exposed.

It is simply a little annoying that you have to be constantly aware of where your hands are when shooting. We can't help but feel that this was absolutely avoidable by the design team. The main shooter also protrudes quite a lot which means that it is inevitably going to get scuffed or scratched.

And if the rest of the plastic is any indication for material quality, we can only imagine that it won't be long until photos start to come out blurry and fuzzy. Speaking of the back panel it is part of the unibody design and is thus non-removable, just like the one on the Desire It houses the 2, mAh Li-Po battery, which really seems rather unprepared to handle the power requirements, but more on that later.

SIM and SD slots are positioned on the side of the Desire , nicely tugged away behind a plastic flap in their own little compartment. We weren't too eager to play around with it as it seems kind of flimsy and could potentially suffer if caught on a pocket edge or other piece of clothing.

On the other hand, this setup does offer ease of access to the cards and is a welcome sight with all the recent cradle and caddy designs, which are often a struggle. The buttons feel cheap and plastic. The top of the phablet features a 3.

The bottom is home to just the microUSB 2. The HTC Desire is equipped with a 5. It is nothing spectacular by today's standards, but is nonetheless, a solid choice for a mid-range smartphone.

As already mentioned the panel is identical to that found in its predecessor - the Desire and is consequently plagued by much the same problems. While the panel does use IPS technology and hence offers excellent side viewing angles, the edges on the screen elements looks a little jagged under close observation.

Bet perhaps the biggest concern is the poor brightness. The phone doesn't come off as exceptionally bright, but this is more or less compensated by the good contrast, which definitely improves outside visibility.

Looking at the specs sheet, we can't help but notice that although the Desire borrows the display from the , the lack of screen protection has been addressed and the handset is equipped with Gorilla Glass 3.

What good is a quality screen that is all scratched-up. HTC definitely deserves credit for improved attention in this department. The added protective layer seems to be have led to a slight increase in reflectivity as the blacks on the Desire apper a bit brighter than on the Desire On the other hand maximum brigtness seems to show a slight improvement, boosting the whites and consequently, the contrast.

It is also absolutely identical to the one found in the Desire , but surprisingly enough, while the Desire scored quite favorably at 64h, this is not exactly true for the phone at hand. Our tests showed an oddly low 49h endurance rating and may we remind that this is a mixed result from fairly favorable conditions.

Still the numbers speak loud and clear and the Desire will not be winning any endurance races any time soon. The question remains as to why this anomaly exists. The two devices seem similar enough for the scores to match up, but seeing as this is not the case, we can perhaps point a finger towards the new octa-core Snapdragon processors or, if not that, software issues that need some tweaking.

The possibility of a faulty test unit is also there, but it seems very unlikely. You can check out our battery testing procedure in detail. There are also two separate power-saving modes implemented in Sense UI 6 that could potentially help better the battery life.

Power Saving dims the screen and slows the CPU down, while the Extreme Power Saving mode does away with multitasking and background tasks altogether and switches the UI to a very simple version, meant for only the most basic of tasks.

The Extreme Power Saving mode turns the Desire into a feature phone. While this is extremely useful to have and could potentially get you out of a tight situation, the two modes are for emergency use only and therefore had no place in out measurements.

The device uses only nanoSIM cards, despite the ample room, but it is far from the only offender in this department. The built-in Dual network manager also allows the manual selection of the mode of each slot, so you can change which slot will be 3G-enabled from the UI without having to physically rearrange the cards.

HTC's website does not disclose anything in regard to NFC functionality, but we are happy to report that our unit does have this functionality onboard. It might be a regional option, as was with the Desire , so be sure to check before you buy a unit.

Speaking of that, the Bluetooth-enabled HTC BoomBass cube can pair wirelessly with the stereo speakers on the phablet for even better sonic experience. HTC Sense 6 is feature-rich and offers a smooth and fluent user experience.

The lockscreen features a clock with weather info plus four shortcut slots. Missed calls and incoming messages are duly displayed, too, of course. Widgets are optional and disabled by default.

Swiping up the unlock button gives you three different options. Swiping up takes you to the last app you used, while swiping to the left or to the right will take you to the homescreen or BlinkFeed respectively.

HTC Sense 6 lockscreen with optional widgets. This generation of HTC products features on-screen buttons with the classic arrangement of Back, Home and App switcher. HTC's custom scheme of only Back and Home key has been dropped and we don't miss it.

It aggregates content from your social networks, as well as from over a thousand news sources. You can pick the topics you're interested in and BlinkFeed will automatically pull relevant content. You can also search for specific content.

BlinkFeed combines social updates with news articles. Homescreens are fully customizable with links and widgets. If you don't find BlikFeed particularly useful and don't want it lingering on the front you can do away with it just like any other widget.

The notification area features quick toggles similar to those of vanilla Android. They can be accessed via the dedicated button or with a two-finger swipe. The toggles can't be reordered or hidden, but a long press brings out the relevant Settings page, just like in Samsung's TouchWiz.

Some like the Brightness toggle are multi stage so you tap them several times until you reach the desired mode and often have a more precise slider option in the settings area. Power toggles made it to the notification area.

Note that the status bar on top of the screen is normally semi-transparent or black, but select HTC apps change its color to match their own highlight color, similar to iOS. This doesn't seem to work with third-party apps though.

The default layout of the app drawer is a 4 x 5 grid of app icons. A 3 x 4 mode is also available but that's a waste of a 5. You can sort app icons alphabetically, chronologically or manually and you can hide the ones you don't need but can't uninstall bloatware.

HTC has remodeled the task switching interface - recent apps are displayed in a 3 x 3 grid of thumbnails. This allows more apps to fit on the screen but since there's no scrolling, a total of 9 is all the recent apps you'll see.

This does not limit multitasking, but you can easily lose track of older open applications. Custom app switcher complete with a shortcut for the Running apps screen. HTC Sense has a dedicated Car mode screen, which can be preset to launch automatically when the phablet connects to your car's Bluetooth.

Car mode with big, easy to hit buttons. HTC Desire also has a built-in restricted access Kid mode. It is an app that lets you set up a profile for each of your kids - with a photo and birthdate - and pick which apps they can have access to.

This is a notable improvement over its predecessor, the Desire , but interestingly enough, the fairly comparable eight A53 cores do not fair all that well against the four Cortex A7 ones, found inside the A7.

This might just be due to the higher clock rate on the Snapdragon , but all in all, in a lot of respects the Desire does not seem to offer as big of a performance increase as we would have liked to see.

Results with the Basemark OS II were really inconsistent on the Desire for some reason and we found ourselves having to retest several times. The total score is expectedly a bit ahead of the Desire , but single and multi-core tests just seem a little off.

Perhaps it's a software bug or some optimization issue, but in any case the numbers should be taken with a grain of salt. Keep in mind that the chart might also be a little misleading as the Desire is absent and for a good reason.

It was tested under Antutu 4, which had a different scoring chart, but the difference between the two is pretty much identical to the one observed in GeekBench. The Adreno GPU is nothing spectacular and the Desire fails to amaze in most rendering tests but definitely holds its own.

Real-life performance is of course, a whole other question and as evident from the onscreen scores, the mid-ranged device handles rendering nicely. The lower screen resolution has certainly attributed towards the respectable scores.

The Adreno offscreen graphics test at p resolution is rather disappointing, but expected for the particular chip. The onscreen performance is much better and the device delivers very respectable frame rates almost topping the charts.

As already mentioned, the lower screen resolution does aid a lot but one thing is for sure, the Desire delivers playable frame-rates on graphics-intensive tasks, something that the Desire is badly struggling with.

JavaScript performance is not great, though it's in line with what we can expect from a mid-range device. In the BrowserMark 2. These tests fully stress the browser we used the stock browser, by the way , in daily browsing the phablet works without annoying slowdowns.

Interestingly enough, looking back at the Desire yet again, we can't help but notice a very slight improvement in overall browser performance. Taking into account the fact that the pair uses the same HTC Sense software, we have to deduct that the Desire is mostly under-optimized rather than underpowered and this, while fixable is all up to the manufacturer to address at this point.

The HTC Desire is a middle of the road device when it comes to performance. It's not sluggish by any means and it will do okay for daily multitasking, browsing and even 3D games. From a user point of view, we didn't experience any major hiccups and the UI does look and feel very polished and functional, but more on that later.

The People app groups the dialer, call log, contacts, favorites and groups in tabs, which can be reordered or removed. A dropdown allows you to filter contacts by source - stored in the phone, coming from an online phonebook or a social network.

Individual contact info is displayed in tabs too, a Sense tradition. The first tab shows basic contact info like phone numbers, emails, work info plus individual options for ringtones, blocking the contact and adding them to Private contacts.

Private contacts is a discrete option that hides the name and photo of a contact when there's an incoming call. Viewing a contact's basic info. The second tab, Thread lists all communication history between you and the given contact - texts, emails and calls.

The third and final tab displays the contact's social networking updates for easy access. Tabs here can be reordered and hidden, too. The dialer on the HTC Desire displays the last call with a contact photo so you can easily redial someone.

There's smart dialing that looks for both names and contacts. You can even switch to a regular QWERTY keyboard though you have to do this each time you open the dialer and we still find that the dial pad is quicker, it was invented for a reason after all.

There's a Large dial pad mode, which predictably makes the buttons bigger but also displays the full call log behind the pad instead of just the last call as with the Standard dial pad. When you try to scroll the list, the dial pad gets out of the way.

For these reasons we preferred this mode over the Standard. It is just a more user-friendly experience. The Large dial pad has bigger keys and a full list of recent calls. The HTC Desire can ring louder when it detects it's in a pocket, quiet down when you pick it up and shut up altogether when you flip it over.

The Do not disturb mode can mute all notifications including timers and alarms if you like on a given schedule with multiple rules, e. Only contacts on the exceptions list can get through in case of emergency.

Contacts can be added to the blocked list to filter out unwanted calls even outside of Do not disturb mode. If you dial an unknown contact, the dialer can ask you if you want to save it to the phonebook this is disabled by default.

The phablet borrows the BoomSound speakers from the premium One family - two speakers on the front. They put out nice sound though in tuning for audio quality HTC lost some of the loudness. Voice and music levels are virtually equal with the Desire Some threads can be moved to a "secure box", which requires a password to be opened.

There's built-in functionality to block messages from certain numbers, those go in the Block box where you can view them later if you like or set the app to discard them immediately. The look of the app can be tweaked with color schemes and custom backgrounds, font size and how many lines are used for preview in threaded view.

The Messages app can also backup and restore messages, so you don't need a third-party app for that. The HTC Desire comes with two email apps - a skinned version of the stock email app and the dedicated Gmail app.

The native one has a combined inbox and supports options for peak and off-peak syncing. For both you can have the app check for new mail after a preset periods or use Smart Sync to learn your habits and automatically figure out the best interval.

The Mail app has a combined Inbox. The keyboard offers big, comfortable keys and you can run a calibration tool if you think the default setup slips up. A Swype-like Trace option is available and you can enable bilingual prediction vital with so many English terms entering every day speech in most languages.

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This program is available only to Egypt residents. To place an order online, do the following: Look for products with fulfilled by Souq badge. HTC Dot View Case Instant phone access while the case is closed Dot matrix cover allow you to take calls, receive emails, schedule reminders and more - without opening the case Premium and durable material Extremely lightweight, and thin Retro look Easy to clip on and remove.

HTC Dot View Case Instant phone access while the case is closed Dot matrix cover allow you to take calls, receive emails, schedule reminders and more - without opening the case Premium and durable material Extremely lightweight, and thin Retro look Easy to clip on and remove the cover Full protection for your phone from bumps and scratches Access to all ports and buttons without compromising functionality Designed specifically for HTC Desire



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We won't expect much from an entry level smartphone, but an upper midrange device like the Desire deserves a higher quality finish than the fingerprint mess that the plastic back panel becomes in no time. It can plan driving, public transport, cycling and walking routes. Another thing to note is that the colors seems a bit oversaturated, but oftentimes it's how users prefer them. The device uses only nanoSIM cards, despite the ample room, but it is far from the only offender in this department. The keyboard offers big, comfortable keys and you can run a calibration tool if you think the default setup slips up. HTC has built-up a formidable reputation for offering some of the best-built devices on the market.



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